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Ginormous News: A Secret Blog Entry about Beyoncé

December 29, 2013

OMG!  I’ve been thinking about writing this blog post since I heard about Beyoncé’s no-longer-secret album two weeks ago.

Yet I’ve kept it secret, even from my wife, from Beyoncé and from Beyoncé’s producer, because apparently no one tells him anything anyway.

I’ve kept this blog post a secret for the same reason that Beyoncé kept her album a secret.  If I told anyone about it when I first thought about writing it, it wouldn’t be news today.  But since I’m telling you now, it’s big news.  After all, we’re talking about Beyoncé.

Maybe, like Beyoncé, I can get 1.2 million tweets within 12 hours of posting this.  Maybe I can break Bey’s new record of more than 5,300 tweets per minute.  On the other hand, I don’t have a social media and public relations team working non-stop to promote my blog.  But maybe I can get a few comments!

Beware of Fake News

December 6, 2013

What do you get when you combine an advertisement with a news story? Those in the industry would say, “An advertorial.” Those who have spent money on advertorials, though, would say, “Not much.”

The advertorial is the illegitimate child of advertising and journalism. It represents the worst of both worlds, as it lacks the credibility of journalism and the effectiveness of advertising. It’s as tacky as an infomercial and generally as worthy of attention as yesterday’s weather forecast.

Kill the Beast!

May 20, 2013

"Maybe there is a beast. ... maybe it's only us.'"

William Golding, Lord of the Flies

 

The anarchy of the Internet is one of its greatest attractions.  Anyone can say anything.  And, when leaving comments, we’re all equals.

So what should I make of the discussion I began in the LinkedIn group Public Relations and Communications Professionals that has attracted more than 250 comments?

Common Sense Needed To Avoid Common Mistakes

April 4, 2013

When it comes to marketing, common sense isn’t all that common. The same easily avoided mistakes seem to be made repeatedly.

The offenders come from many different industries, from companies large and small, and from throughout the world. Many of the following mistakes are even made by communications professionals (excluding the author, of course).