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Abused Word of the Day: Curate

January 15, 2017

It makes sense to create, manage, optimize, share and promote your content, but do we really need to “curate” it?

Ironically, today’s hip and modern social media experts have borrowed the word from dusty, musty museums, which use curators to organize and manage exhibits. Museum curators don’t call historical relics and works of art “content,” and social media types shouldn’t call themselves “curators.”

The word “curate” is derived from the Middle English curat, which was a “person charged with the care of souls.” Sweet Jesus! We doubt your content curator would ever be confused with a parish priest.

According to social media expert Rohit Bhargava, a content curator is “someone who continually finds, groups, organizes and shares the best and most relevant content on a specific issue online.”

In other words, a content curator is a content manager. Why not call it that?

Don’t Forget the Content (Content Marketing, Part 4)

April 24, 2014

While companies are increasingly devoting resources to content marketing, they’re spending so much time managing, sharing, amplifying, promoting, optimizing, aggregating, repurposing and curating content that they’re not putting much thought into creating content.

Many companies treat “content” as a commodity, as though it matters little what’s in it, as long as it’s updated regularly.

Not all content is created equal, yet many companies are simply grabbing content from other blogs and websites and presenting it as though it were their own (i.e., they’re using content aggregators to repurpose content).  Others are presenting original content, but it’s often produced by attorneys, accountants, investment managers and other specialists who are not necessarily people whose writing anyone would want to read.

Creating a Content Marketing Plan (Content Marketing, Part 3)

April 23, 2014

For content marketing to succeed, the Content Marketing Institute recommends using seven “building blocks.”

They include plan, audience, story, channels, process, conversations and measurement.

As with the definition of content marketing that CMI provides, this is marketing basics disguised as something new.  Missing from the mix is research, which is necessary when developing a plan and identifying the needs of the “audience” (i.e., potential customers).

Your “story” is your marketing message, told through a variety of “channels,” which distribute the message using a “process” that should change as social and other media evolve.

Becoming Your Own Publisher (Content Marketing, Part 2)

April 22, 2014

Content marketing is a form of self-publishing.

Instead of publicizing company news, publishing articles in media or arranging interviews on newsworthy topics, content marketers typically write and post content on a blog, then “amplify” their message by tweeting it, and posting on LinkedIn, Facebook, YouTube and elsewhere.

Blogs are the media and social media are the channels for distributing your news.  An e-blast can serve both purposes.  In either case, you get to control your news, develop your messaging and target your audience as narrowly or as broadly as you’d like.  However, you also have to develop your own audience.

Goodbye Public Relations, Hello Content Marketing (Content Marketing, Part 1)

April 21, 2014

Today, content marketing rules.  We create content, manage content, share content and even try to amplify content.  Content is being promoted, optimized, aggregated, repurposed and even curated.

So what is this thing called “content marketing” and how can it help your business?

The Content Marketing Institute defines content marketing as “a marketing technique of creating and distributing valuable, relevant and consistent content to attract and acquire a clearly defined audience – with the objective of driving profitable customer action.”

The CMI provides plenty of free information, but it could use some help with its content, which is loaded with marketing clichés, so allow me to translate that definition for you.