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Abused Word of the Day: Fascist

February 12, 2018

Today, those who call others “fascists” often have more in common with fascists than the people they’re criticizing.

The word “fascist” comes from the Italian word “fascio,” meaning “group” or “bundle,” because under fascism, the emphasis is on the group with few individual rights. A fascist believes in a strong central government and has no tolerance for opposing opinions.

That sounds a lot like Antifa, the antifascist organization.

You may dislike President Trump, but that doesn’t make him a fascist. In fact, President Obama came closer to being a fascist, as he greatly expanded the role of government and set a record for adding new regulations, frequently without seeking Congressional approval.

When President Obama took office, the U.S. ranked fifth on the Index for Economic Freedom. After eight years of increasing government control through the most excessive regulation in the country’s history, the U.S. ranked 17th. In contrast, President Trump has been deregulating.

Fascism typically evolves from socialism or communism. As Nobel Prize winning economist Friedrich A. Hayek wrote, “Fascism is the stage reached after communism has proved an illusion.” Nazism, likewise, evolved from socialism. Hayek’s book, The Road to Serfdom, was written as a warning to the United States and the United Kingdom, which were becoming increasingly socialistic.

Keep that in mind the next time you think about calling someone who disagrees with you a fascist.

Abused Word of the Day - Ecosystem

June 18, 2014

Use of environmental metaphors does not make a company environmentally friendly, green or sustainable.  Yet they’ve been polluting corporate language since at least 1993, when consultant James F. Moore won a McKinsey Award for his 1993 article in Harvard Business Review, “Predators and Prey: A New Ecology of Competition.”

Since then, a whole industry has developed around the concept of “sustainable business.”  Sustainable business practices have helped businesses become more efficient, but too often businesses expend more effort on talking than they do on acting.

Remember Enron?  The company was talking green and fuzzy in a big way just before it imploded.

At the least, “sustainable” business practices can be beneficial, although the only way for a business to be truly sustainable is to unplug every machine and prevent employees from breathing.